EVENTS  

Spring 2020 AnthroSeminars

We are delighted to open a call for our first Department of Anthropology Photo Contest. Submissions are due March 23. If you could define anthropologies of tomorrow in a single picture, what would it look like? Learn more about the contest and submit here:



 

 


 

LATEST NEWS 


2/21/2020  We are delighted to open a call for our first Department of Anthropology Photo Contest. Submissions are due March 23. If you could define anthropologies of tomorrow in a single picture, what would it look like? Learn more about the contest and submit here

2/17/2020  Since October 2019, cities across Iraq have witnessed ongoing popular protests representing a broad cross-section of the Iraqi public; women and men, young and old, Sunni and Shia, of all classes, from all regions of Iraq are chanting, “We want a homeland!” Thousands have been injured and hundreds killed. Kali Rubaii, one of only a few un-embedded anthropologists to spend extended time in Iraq, helps us understand why these protests are happening and how they relate to the global anti-imperialism movement. Read more here.

2/13/2020  Congratulations to Dr. Zoe Nyssa on her recent publication in the volume, Anthropocene Unseen: A Lexicon, edited by Cymene How and Anand Pandian! In her entry “Surprise!” Dr. Nyssa explores the complicated outcomes of environmental policies, such as how climate-friendly ethanol fuels can result in food shortages and energy-efficient lights may incentivize energy consumption. The volume includes short essays and images by scholars in a variety of disciplines, looking at the Anthropocene from numerous angles. 

1/29/2020  Assistant professor of anthropology Melanie Beasley was invited to serve as an isotope expert at a forensic workshop hosted by the International Committee of the Red Cross in South Africa. Thousands of migrants die each year along perilous routes in Africa and beyond, many without identification. The workshop is a collaborative humanitarian effort to help determine how stable isotope methods can be implemented to help identify migrants who die each year. 

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