Fall 2022 English Courses

This is the unofficial version of the Fall 2022 English courses.  Information is correct at time of publishing and will be updated frequently.  However, the official class listings are available on the following site https://wl.mypurdue.purdue.edu/ (log in with your Purdue career account info and navigate to the Schedule of Classes link). That page should be considered as the most up-to-date information.


20200-001-15673 Engaging English, MWF 09:30 AM-10:20 AM, Michael Johnston
20200-002-25089 Engaging English, MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM, Michael Johnston 
20200-003-24228 Engaging English, MWF 01:30 PM-02:20 PM, Jessica Mercado, Learning Community

This theme-based course introduces students to the field of English, and provides foundational liberal arts skills. It teaches, for instance, critical and creative thinking, reading, and writing using a variety of genres, texts, and media.

20300-001-15717 Introduction To Research For Professional Writers, MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM, Shelton Weech

Introduction to research sources and methods useful for professional writers, including electronic resources. Focus on collecting print and online information, interviewing, surveying, and conducting observations; and on evaluating, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting research.

20400-001-24868 Poetry And Visual Art, TR 10:30 AM-11:45 AM, Kate O'Donoghue

A course in writing, with the special topic selected by the instructor.

20500-001-19509 Introduction To Creative Writing, MWF 08:30 AM-09:20 AM, Blake Chernin
20500-002-19516 Introduction To Creative Writing, MWF 09:30 AM-10:20 AM, Casey Gray
20500-003-19512 Introduction To Creative Writing, MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM, Casey Gray
20500-004-19514 Introduction To Creative Writing, MWF 03:30 PM-04:20 PM, Kirby Knowlton
20500-005-19511 Introduction To Creative Writing, MWF 12:30 PM-01:20 PM, Amy Jackson
20500-006-19515 Introduction To Creative Writing, MWF 01:30 PM-02:20 PM, Amy Jackson
20500-007-22715 Introduction To Creative Writing, MWF 02:30 PM-03:20 PM, Suraj Alva
20500-008-21750 Introduction To Creative Writing, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Kate O'Donoghue
20500-009-29471 Introduction To Creative Writing, MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM, Toluwalase Akinwale

Practice in writing short prose narratives and poetry for students who have finished composition and wish to expand into creative work. Workshop criticism and discussion of published writing.

22700-001-25157 Elements Of Linguistics, TR 12:00 PM-01:15 PM, Alexis Zhou, SIS TA; xlist LC261 LING201
22700-002-25158 Elements Of Linguistics, MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM, Leah Nodar, SIS TA; xlist LC261 LING201
22700-003-25159 Elements Of Linguistics, MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM, Vanessa Sheu, SIS TA; xlist LC261 LING201
22700-004-25160 Elements Of Linguistics, MWF 12:30 PM-01:20 PM, Yuhyeon Seo, SIS TA; xlist LC261 LING201
22700-005-25161 Elements Of Linguistics, MWF 01:30 PM-02:20 PM, Seyyed Hatam Tamimi Sa'd, SIS TA; xlist LC261 LING201

A summary of what is known about human language, its structure, its universality, and its diversity; language in its social setting; language in relation to other aspects of human inquiry and knowledge.

23000-001-19526 Great Narrative Works, MWF 03:30 PM-04:20 PM, Arkady Plotnitsky

Reading and discussion of great narratives from Homer’s Odyssey to the present, considering works from a variety of cultures and time periods in order to develop an understanding of their ideas, structures, styles, and cultural values.

23200-027-25447 Arab-American Literature, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Ahmed Idrissi Alami, SLC PROF; xlist ARAB230 AMST201 CMPL230 LC230
23200-028-26105 Russian And Slavic Fairy Tales, MWF 09:30 AM-10:20 AM, Amina Gabrielov, SLC LECT; xlist RUSS298 LC231
23200-029-27523 The Tragic Vision, MWF 12:30 PM-01:20 PM, Erin Moodie, SLC PROF; xlist CLCS238 CMPL230
23200-030-28694 Introduction To Disability Studies, MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM, Jason Abad, xlist CDIS239

Examination of a particular theme, such as the hero, death, or the city, and the techniques by which it is treated in various literary works, usually in more than one genre.

23800-001-17000 Introduction To Fiction, MWF 02:30 PM-03:20 PM, Emily Pearson
23800-002-16378 Introduction To Fiction, MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM, Na Rim Kim
23800-003-26566 Introduction To Fiction, MWF 12:30 PM-01:20 PM, Na Rim Kim

How to read fiction intelligently; promotes understanding and appreciation of the range, values, techniques, and meanings of fiction genres.

24100-001-24229 British Literature After 1789, TR 09:00 AM-10:15 AM, Wendy Flory

A historically oriented survey of genres, authors, and texts from the Romantic period on.

24900-001-24231 Great British Books, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Geraldine Friedman

Why are British books so compelling?  This course examines the dynamic history of British literature and explores how canonical and contemporary texts shaped the cultural landscape of Britain, the British Empire, and the world.

25000-001-19550 Great American Books, TR 03:00 PM-04:15 PM, Robert Lamb

What makes great American books so compelling?  This course examines the dynamic history of American literature and explores how canonical and contemporary books have shaped the landscape of the U.S. and the world.

25700-LC1-17295 Literature Of Black America, MWF 12:30 PM-01:20 PM, Jennifer Freeman Marshall

A survey of literature written by black American authors. Close attention is paid to the history of black literature and to the historical context in which it was written, as well as to the texts of major works by black writers.

26400-002-15720 Bible As Literature, Arr. Hours, Angelica Duran, Distance

A study of selections from the Old and New Testaments as examples of Hebrew and early Christian literature.

26600-001-10364 World Literature: From The Beginnings To 1700 A.D., TR 03:00 PM-04:15 PM, Gwenael Jouin, SIS TA; xlist CMPL266

World literature in translation. A comparative and chronological survey of the masterpieces of Eastern and Western literature.

28000-LC1-16018 Games, Narrative, Culture, TR 10:30 AM-11:45 AM, Samantha Blackmon

This is an introduction to the field of game studies, and to games as narrative and cultural media. We will look at the stories games tell; the way their narrative elements or plot devices intersect with the culture around the games and gaming itself; and how all these things come together to affect game design, meaning, and play.

28600-003-16444 The Movies, M 06:30 PM-09:20 PM, Paul White
28600-004-16451 The Movies, TR 03:30 PM-04:20 PM, Paul White
28600-005-18315 The Movies, TR 04:30 PM-05:20 PM, Paul White

Introduction to the movies from classic to contemporary film.

30100-001-19574 Ways Of Reading, MWF 04:30 PM-05:20 PM, Arkady Plotnitsky

Introduction to literary theory and practice.  Close reading of and significant writing about selected literary texts informed by a variety of critical and/or theoretical perspectives.

30400-001-17173 Advanced Composition, TR 09:00 AM-10:15 AM, Linda Haynes
30400-002-25914 Advanced Composition, TR 12:00 PM-01:15 PM, Linda Haynes

Designed for students who wish additional training in composition beyond the basic requirements. Extensive practice in the writing of mature expository, critical, and argumentative prose. (The course satisfies the Indiana certification requirement of three hours of advanced composition.).

30600-001-19578 Introduction To Professional Writing, TR 03:00 PM-04:15 PM, Patricia Sullivan

Development of skill in analyzing rhetorical situations in the workplace. Practice in planning, writing, evaluating, and revising a variety of documents typical of those used in the arts and industry.

30900-002-19567 Digital Design And Production, TR 09:00 AM-10:15 AM, Holly Baker

The development of the ability to write and design documents using electronic publishing technologies. Students will receive instruction in writing, graphics, and publishing software and will write, design, produce, and critique a number of publications.

31700-001-25911 Craft Of Poetry, TR 03:00 PM-04:15 PM, Kate O'Donoghue

This course focuses on the craft of poetry with some consideration of its underlying principles from a writer’s perspective. Topics of study may include works of poetry, statements of aesthetics and craft, and various poetic forms.

32800-001-25902 English Language II: Structure And Meaning, MW 04:30 PM-05:45 PM, Elena Benedicto; xlist LING321

The structure of American English and its dialects, with emphasis on syntax and semantics, including parts of speech, sentence structure, and meaning. Implications of recent theory for the teaching of English.

32900-003-10829 English Language III: Sound and Form, TR 10:30 AM-11:45 AM, Ye-Jee Jung, SIS TA; xlist LING311 KC361

The structure of American English and its dialects, with emphasis on phonology and morphology. Implications of recent theory to the teaching of English.

34400-001-17184 Environmental Ethics, Policy, and Sustainability, MWF 02:30 PM-03:20 PM, Robert Marzec

Environmental Ethics is an interdisciplinary course designed to open new pathways into ethical and ecocritical inquiry in the anthropocene age.  The course analyzes disciplinary differences in approaching the ethical, the human, and environmental problems such as sustainability, development, biodiversity, global security, and climate change.  Students will explore what it means to be ethical in and through an interrogation of our contemporary conceptions of what it means to be human.  These interrogations in turn will prompt us to reconsider human creations such as knowledge, culture, and technology, which will push us to genuinely think how humans as a species situate their creations within the realm of what they call Nature. Students will be introduced to the history of environmental studies in the discipline, to the rise of what is now known as “postcolonial ecocriticism,” to theoretical inquiry into modern technology, and to other recent developments in the fields of environmental studies.

35000-001-24232 American Literature Before 1865, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Ryan Schneider

A historically oriented survey of genres, authors, and texts from European colonization to the U.S. Civil War.

36000-001-16249 Gender And Literature, TR 04:30 PM-05:45 PM, Geraldine Friedman

An introduction to feminist approaches to the study of literature, including poetry, drama, fiction, and/or autobiography. Examines how gender intersects with race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and class in shaping authorship, reading, and representation.

36500-001-24233 Literature And Imperialism, MWF 03:30 PM-04:20 PM, Thomas Daniel

A study through cultural and theoretical works of the impact of imperialism on the ruling nations.

36600-001-24246 Postcolonial Literatures, MWF 02:30 PM-03:20 PM, Aparajita Sagar

A study of Third World Literature, film, and theory that emerged during and after Western rule.

36700-001-16321 Mystery and Detective Fiction, MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM, Nush Powell

An introduction to the detective genre, examining its origins, its characteristics, and its intersections with empiricism, forensic science, race, class, gender, sex, and empire.

37300-001-16020 Science Fiction And Fantasy, MWF 09:30 AM-10:20 AM, Erin McNulty
37300-002-20440 Science Fiction And Fantasy, MWF 01:30 PM-02:20 PM, Marybeth Perdomo
37300-003-24248 Science Fiction And Fantasy, MWF 02:30 PM-03:20 PM, Marybeth Perdomo

Representative works of science fiction and fantasy examined in relation to both mainstream and popular literature. Emphasis is on technique, theme, and form.

37700-001-24252 Modern And Contemporary Poetry, TR 12:00 PM-01:15 PM, Wendy Flory

A study of poetry in English from the twentieth century to the present.

37900-001-16889 The Short Story, TR 04:30 PM-05:45 PM, Robert Lamb

A study of the development and features of the short story genre.

38000-001-24253 Issues in Rhetoric and Public Life, MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM, Harry Denny

Study of how language and media create belief and change. Examines ancient and contemporary rhetorical theory as it applies to public discourse, media, and technology. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. 

38600-001-64289 History of Film to 1950, M 06:30 PM-09:20 PM, John Duvall
38600-002-64290 History of Film to 1950, TR 09:30 AM-10:20 AM, John Duvall

This survey crosses the divide between the silent film era and the "talkies" to explore narrative, experimental, and documentary styles of feature films from the 1890s to 1950.

39100-001-17894 Composition for English Teachers, MWF 09:30 AM-10:20 AM, Lanette Jimerson

Exploration of the theory, research, and pedagogy of teaching writing at the secondary level. Topics include the development of writing assignments and related activities, the study of writing process models, and the evaluation of student work in a variety of genres.

39200-001-15676 Young Adult Literature, MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM, Arianna Banack

This course examines the construct of Young Adult Literature as a genre crafted specifically for adolescents. Using both classic and contemporary novels, as well as relevant theoretical and research texts, this course explores how YA literature is defined, what it offers to adolescent readers, and how it is situated in the literary landscape.

39600-001-16365 Writing For Law, TR 05:30 PM-06:45 PM, Barry Loftus
39600-004-25853 Teaching For Social Justice, TR 10:30 AM-11:20 AM, TBD; xlist EDCI381
39600-005-25854 Teaching For Social Justice, Arr. Hours, TBD
39600-006-24254 Rhetorics Of Religion, TR 09:00 AM-10:15 AM, Thomas Rickert; xlist REL491

A course in the study of a special topic directed by an instructor in whose particular field of specialization the content of the course falls.

40700-002-17453 Intermediate Poetry Writing, TR 12:00 PM-01:15 PM, TBD  
40700-001-19608 Intermediate Poetry Writing, TR 04:30 PM-05:45 PM, TBD  

Study and practice of methods of composing poetry, with primary emphasis on the student’s own work. Workshop criticism and discussion of published writing.

40800-001-19610 Creative Writing Capstone, TR 12:00 PM-01:15 PM, Donald Platt

This course will focus on the writing and revision of the capstone thesis in Creative Writing, consisting of a substantial portfolio of either fiction or poetry with an introductory essay. Workshop, discussion of published writing, and individual conferences will form the center of the course with readings, lecture, and discussion of various literary topics. Permission of instructor required.

40900-001-59080 Intermediate Fiction Writing, MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM, Casey Gray
40900-002-46129 Intermediate Fiction Writing, TR 12:00 PM-01:15 PM, Terese Mailhot

Study and practice of methods of composing fiction, with a primary emphasis on the student’s own work. Workshop criticism and discussion of published fiction.

41100-001-24865 Chaucer And Subjectivity, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Robyn Bartlett

A study of the literary, critical, or cinematic works of one or two influential authors or directors. May be repeated for credit only with a different topic.

41200-001-16405 American Short Story, TR 10:30 AM-11:45 AM, Ryan Schneider

A study of literary or cinematic works that share distinctive formal features. May be repeated for credit only with a different topic.

41900-001-19619 Multimedia Writing, MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM, Kaden Milliren
41900-002-19620 Multimedia Writing, MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM, Victoria Braegger

Multimedia writing for networked contexts. Emphasizes principles, and practices of multimedia design, implementation, and publishing. Typical genres include Web sites, interactive media, digital video, visual presentations, visual argument, and user documentation.

42000-001-43010 Business Writing, MWF 08:30 AM-09:20 AM, Christopher Barber
42000-002-43042 Business Writing, MWF 09:30 AM-10:20 AM, Sarah Nestor
42000-003-43032 Business Writing, MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM, Sarah Nestor
42000-004-43048 Business Writing, MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM, Cassius Epps
42000-005-43046 Business Writing, MWF 12:30 PM-01:20 PM, Kaden Milliren
42000-006-43064 Business Writing, MWF 01:30 PM-02:20 PM, Antony Ricks
42000-007-43034 Business Writing, MWF 02:30 PM-03:20 PM, Antony Ricks
42000-008-10828 Business Writing, MWF 03:30 PM-04:20 PM, Adrianna Deptula
42000-009-43054 Business Writing, MWF, 04:30 PM-05:20 PM, Robert Beck
42000-010-43016 Business Writing, TR 09:00 AM-10:15 AM, Alison Caddell
42000-011-43068 Business Writing, TR 10:30 AM-11:45 AM, Alison, Caddell
42000-012-43020 Business Writing, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, TBD
42000-013-43022 Business Writing, TR 03:00 PM-04:15 PM, Dee Mccormick
42000-014-43058 Business Writing, TR 04:30 PM-05:45 PM, TBD
42000-015-43014 Business Writing, MWF 09:30 AM-10:20 AM, Danielle Giles
42000-016-43006 Business Writing, MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM, Jessica Berchtold
42000-017-14800 Business Writing, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Susan Wegener
42000-E01-16130 Business Writing, TR 10:30 AM-11:45 AM, Jianfen Chen
42000-E02-16129 Business Writing, TR 09:00 AM-10:15 AM, Jianfen Chen
42000-Y01-21285 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Rachael Bailey
42000-Y02-21288 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Rachael Bailey
42000-Y03-21289 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Maryam Ghafoor
42000-Y04-21290 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Maryam Ghafoor
42000-Y05-21291 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Maryam Ghafoor
42000-Y06-25418 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Sarah Nestor
42000-Y07-25419 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Sarah Nestor
42000-Y08-25420 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Alison Caddell
42000-Y09-25421 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Alison Caddell
42000-Y10-25422 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Antony Ricks
42000-Y11-25423 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Antony Ricks
42000-Y12-25941 Business Writing, Arr. Hours, Susan Wegener

Workplace writing in networked environments for management contexts. Emphasizes organizational context, project planning, document management, ethics, research, team writing. Typical genres include management memos, reports, letters, e-mail, resumes (print and online), oral presentations.

42100-001-19168 Technical Writing, TR 10:30 AM-11:45 AM, Holly Baker
42100-002-19177 Technical Writing, TR 12:00 PM-01:15 PM, Jolene Lark
42100-003-19180 Technical Writing, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Tracy Clark
42100-004-19129 Technical Writing, MWF 09:30 AM-10:20 AM, Victoria Braegger
42100-005-19135 Technical Writing, MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM, Melissa Defrench
42100-006-19143 Technical Writing, MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM, Melissa Defrench
42100-007-14949 Technical Writing, MWF 12:30 PM-01:20 PM, Maryam Ghafoor 
42100-Y01-21298 Technical Writing, Arr. Hours, Rachael Bailey
42100-Y02-21300 Technical Writing, Arr. Hours, Rachael Bailey
42100-Y03-21302 Technical Writing, Arr. Hours, Tracy Clark
42100-Y04-21306 Technical Writing, Arr. Hours, Melissa Defrench
42100-Y05-21307 Technical Writing, Arr. Hours, Melissa Defrench
42100-Y06-25427 Technical Writing, Arr. Hours, Holly Baker
42100-Y07-25428 Technical Writing, Arr. Hours, Holly Baker
42100-Y08-25944 Technical Writing, Arr. Hours, Mark Zamierowski
42100-Y09-25943 Technical Writing, Arr. Hours, Mark Zamierowski
42100-Y10-25945 Technical Writing, Arr. Hours, TBD

Workplace writing in networked environments for technical contexts. Emphasizes context and user analysis, data analysis/display, project planning, document management, usability, ethics, research, team writing. Typical genres include technical reports, memos, documentation, Web sites.

42201-002-68573 Writing for the Health and Human Sciences, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Dee Mccormick,  
42201-003-68574 Writing for the Health and Human Sciences, TR 12:00 PM-01:15 PM, Tracy Clark

This course applies rhetorical principles to writing in health, hospitality, nutrition, nursing and related fields in the Health and Human Sciences.

42400-001-24256 Writing for High Technology Industries, TR 04:30 PM-05:45 PM, Patricia Sullivan

Applies principles of effective professional writing to the planning, production, and evaluation of computer user manuals and other writing tasks.

46200-001-24263 The Bible as Literature: The Old Testament, MW 04:30 PM-05:45 PM, Sandor Goodhart

A study of the Old Testament – Pentateuch, Prophets, and other books such as Psalms, Proverbs, Job, and Ecclesiastes – with emphasis on its unique literary characteristics.

46300-001-24264 The Bible as Literature: The New Testament, TR 10:30 AM-11:45 AM, Angelica Duran

A study of the New Testament, with emphasis on its unique literary characteristics.

49000-002-25916 Worksite Internship Practicum, TR 12:00 PM-01:15 PM, Mark Haugen 

Course facilitates the transition between an English undergraduate degree and the workplace or professional life. The course has two components: a professor-guided component and a practicum component in a chosen area. Permission of instructor required.

50200-002-19693 Practicum in Teaching Creative Writing, T 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Sharon Solwitz
50200-003-19683, Practicum in Teaching Written ESL, Arr. Hours, Harris Bras
50200-004-19694 Practicum in Teaching Oral ESL, T 03:30 PM-04:20 PM, Kyle Swanson
50200-004-19694, Practicum in Teaching Oral ESL, T, 03:30 PM-04:20 PM, Mark Haugen

Reading professional literature, preparing syllabi; evaluating student papers, leading discussions. Required of all teaching assistants in their initial semesters. Credit Hours: 1.00.

50500-002-19698 Approaches to Teaching First-Year Composition I, TR 09:00 AM-10:15 AM, Michael Johnson
50500-006-19701 Approaches to Teaching Creative Writing, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Sharon Solwitz
50500-008-19703 Approaches to Teaching Professional Writing, TR 12:00 PM-01:15 PM, Jennifer Bay
50500-009-30136 Approaches to Teaching Creative Writing, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Angelica Duran

Reading professional literature on the teaching of writing, linguistics, and ESL. Studies of methodologies, issues of assessment, and the relationship between theory and pedagogy. This course is not part of the degree requirement. Open only to teaching assistants in the Department of English. Permission of instructor required.

50600-001-16015 Introduction to English And General Linguistics, TR 04:30 PM-05:45 PM, Victor Raskin; xlist LING500

General study of language and linguistic theory with emphasis on English. Problems and methods in phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Current techniques of linguistics analysis.

50900-001-17452 Advanced Fiction Writing, T 04:30 PM-07:20 PM, Sharon Solwitz

Study of the techniques of writing short stories. Workshop.

51100-001-67790 Semantics, R 06:30 PM-09:20 PM, Victor Raskin, xlist LING531

An introduction to and survey of current semantic theories and methods with an emphasis on English. Basic concepts of linguistic semantics and its relation to the other semantics. Compositional (transformational), model-theoretical (truth-conditional), pragmatic, and contextual semantics.

51200-001-24298 English Syntax and Syntactic Theory, T 04:30 PM-07:20 PM, Elena Benedicto

Introduction to English syntactic structure, syntactic argumentation, and syntactic theory. Emphasis on one current theory as the primary theoretical framework, with other theories considered.

51500-001-24370 Advanced Professional Writing, TR 10:30 AM-11:45 AM, Richard Johnson 

Production of documents and coordination of publishing projects for clients and users; application of advanced principles of document design, rhetoric, collaboration, and project management; and team writing in a computer-networked environment.

51600-001-19709 Teaching English as a Second Language: Theoretical Foundations, TR 10:30 AM-11:45 AM, Lixia Cheng, xlist EDCI591 LING598

Survey of theories of learning and teaching English as a second/foreign/international language. Focus is on current theories and their implications for practice.

54100-001-24313 Studies in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, TR 04:30 PM-05:45 PM, Robyn Bartlett

Critical reading of The Canterbury Tales and related works in Middle English, with attention to the literary and cultural background and to secondary studies.

59100-001-24325 Composition Studies: Theories and Practices, TR 01:30 PM-02:45 PM, Samantha Blackmon

The course historicizes composition theory and practice in the U.S. from its origins in the late 1800s, emphasizing developments that have shaped the discipline since the 1960s through the present.

59600-002-25909 Study & Production of Literary Journals, R 04:30 PM-07:20 PM, Brian Leung
59600-003-28598 Experimental Syntax, TR 10:30 AM-11:45 AM, Elaine Francis, xlist LING598

Advanced study of a topic within the instructor’s fields of specialization. Emphasis on scholarly analysis and research.

60600-001-19749 Seminar In Poetry Writing, T 04:30 PM-07:20 PM, Donald Platt

An advanced course in the writing of poetry. Workshop criticism. Study of the work of established writers. Prerequisite: admission to the MFA program in creative writing.

60700-001-15702 The Theory and Craft of Creative Writing, M 04:30 PM-07:20 PM, Terese Mailhot

A study of the craft of poetry, fiction, or drama with some consideration of underlying theories. Prerequisite: admission to the MFA program in creative writing.

60900-001-19751 Seminar In Fiction Writing, W 06:30 PM-09:20 PM, Brian Leung

An advanced course in the writing of fiction. Workshop critiques. Prerequisite: Admission to the creative writing program.

66900-001-24358 Introduction to Visual Theory and Visual Culture, W 04:30 PM-07:20 PM, Christopher Lukasik, xlist AMST650

Visual studies is the multidisciplinary study of images, viewers, and vision. Students will be provided with an overview of the theories, practices, and histories of the visual from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and historical periods. The seminar will be organized around a series of basic questions (such as what is an image? how do images produce meaning? What do images do? what is vision?) whose responses have come to constitute the field as well as its transdisciplinarity. Readings will be drawn from seminal works in visual theory, cultural semiotics, cultural theory, intermediality, art history, media studies as well as the psychology, philosophy, and science of vision.

68000-025-16274 Crafting Professional Personas, W 01:30 PM-04:20 PM, Thomas Rickert
68000-026-24362 Engagement Seminar, M 11:30 AM-02:20 PM, Jennifer Bay
68000RA-027-24369 Rhetoric & Argument, W 06:30 PM-09:20 PM, Richard Johnson

A variable content course dealing with topics such as cultural studies and composition, medieval rhetoric, renaissance rhetoric, literacy, historiographies of rhetoric, qualitative studies, and professional writing theory. Prerequisite: ENGL 59100.

68100-001-16158 Hutton Lecture in Rhetoric and Composition, R 03:30 PM-06:20 PM, Bradley Dilger

Reading and discussion of the work of contemporary scholarship in rhetoric and composition, accompanied by lectures by visiting scholars.

 

Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (765) 494-4600

© 2021 Purdue University | An equal access/equal opportunity university | Copyright Complaints | Maintained by CLA

If you have trouble accessing this page because of a disability, please contact the College of Liberal Arts Webmaster.

Some content on this site may require the use of a special plug-in or application. Please visit our plug-ins page for links to download these applications.