School of Languages and Cultures GermanCollege of Liberal Arts

 German Courses for SPRING 2019

GER 101: German Level I (First Semester)
GER 101 is an introductory course designed mainly for students who have not previously studied German. By the end of the first semester, you should be able to understand and respond appropriately to simple questions and statements in German. You should also be able to read and react to a variety of German texts, and write about yourself and your likes, dislikes, and interests in German. We also hope that during the semester you will learn more about German culture, have fun with the language, and improve your language-learning strategies.  Note:  there are traditional and online sections of GER 101; there is also an intensive first-year German course (LC 101). 

GER 102: German Level II (Second Semester)
The main goal of GER 102 is to help you learn German at a high beginner’s level. We will focus on listening and reading comprehension, speaking, writing, and cultural literacy. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand and respond to a variety of personal questions, talk about other people, read a wide range of beginner-level texts, express your opinions in writing, and be familiar with a number of cultural themes in German-speaking countries.  Note:  there are traditional and online sections of GER 102. 

GER 201: German Level III (Third Semester)
The main goal of GER 201 is to learn German at an intermediate-low level. We will focus on listening and reading comprehension, speaking, writing, and cultural literacy. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand and contribute to conversations on concrete and predictable topics related to personal information, like yourself and family, daily activities and personal preferences. However, you will also start to be familiar with more abstract topics related to social, cultural or historical themes covered in the textbook. You will also be able to read a variety of texts at the intermediate-low level, and you will begin to express your opinions in writing. 

GER 202: German Level IV (Fourth Semester)
The main goal of GER 202 is to learn German at an intermediate-mid level. We will focus on listening and reading comprehension, speaking, writing, and cultural literacy. The course is the last in a four-course program. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand and contribute to conversations on concrete and predictable topics related to personal information, like yourself and family, daily activities and personal preferences. However, you will also become familiar with and discuss more abstract topics related to social, cultural or historical themes covered in the textbook. You will also be able to read a variety of texts at the intermediate level, and you will express your opinions in writing.

GER 112/212/312: German Conversation Courses
These are one-credit courses that are focused solely on German conversational practice. Students at the 100-, 200-, or 300-level courses can work on their oral and aural skills in a small class for more specific practice of conversational German.

GER 224  German Level IV: Business German
Instructor: TBD
Practical reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension skills directed toward use of German for business purposes. Work on grammar as needed. Course materials cover daily business dealings as well as national and international trade, living conditions, environmental and social problems.

GER 230 German Literature in Translation
Reading and analysis of selected German writers and their works, with particular emphasis on the social, political, and intellectual climate of the times. The course content will change from semester to semester. Knowledge of German not required.

GER 241 Introduction to the Study of German Literature
Instructor: Prof. William, Jennifer
An introduction to the study of German literature based on an overview of the formal elements of poetry, fiction, and drama as well as basic concepts of literary theory. Texts in German; conducted primarily in German.

GER 301: German Level V
Instructor: Dr. Rathmann, Marc
Continued development of German speaking, listening, reading, and writing abilities, using materials dealing primarily with everyday life and civilization in Germany from a variety of sources (e.g., newspapers, magazines, TV, recent literature, internet, etc). Focus on everyday life and culture in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.

GER 302: German Level VI
Instructor: TBD
This course is designed to prepare students for subsequent 300- or 400-level course work in German language, literature, and culture. It includes advanced work on the development of German speaking, listening, reading fluency, and writing abilities with particular emphasis on composition and conversation. As a follow-up course to GER 301, GER 302 focuses on topics dealing with German culture and current events. In the fall of 2018, GER 302 will focus primarily on German media. Students will read authentic texts from a variety of German media sources. German films and TV shows will also be part of the materials used in the course.

GER 323: German for Science and Engineering
Instructor: Dr. Rathmann, Marc
This course is an alternative to GER 302 and focuses on the language used in the fields of science and engineering. Course materials include a variety of current publications about science and engineering from German media and reference books. Course participants do not need to be majors or minors of science or engineering.

GER 330: German Cinema
Instructor: Prof. Allert, Beate
Viewing and analysis of major German contributions to the cinema from the earliest period to the present.  Emphasis on relevant aesthetic theories and on the schools of literature and painting that served as sources.  Evaluation of the German film on the basis of social, artistic, and political criteria.  Knowledge of German not required.

GER 342: German Literature II: From The 18th Century To The 21st Century
Instructor: Prof. Allert, Beate
Reading and discussion of selected texts in German with the dual context of literary movements and historical developments between the 18th and 21st centuries.

GER 402: German Level VIII
Further advanced work on speaking, listening, reading, and writing abilities in German. Course materials will cover a variety of topics illustrated by film and other media, both print and nonprint. Conducted in German.

GER 498 Sport/Spectacle Berlin/Paris
Instructor: William, Jennifer

GER 524: German for the International Trade
Instructor: Rathmann, Marc
GER 524 prepares students for the content and format of the international WiDaF exam (Deutsch als Fremdsprache in der Wirtschaft). It measures and certifies proficiency in business German. In addition to a course pack, a variety of German media sources including news articles, business communication, and videos will be used frequently. Topics include German and international marketing, types of German companies, applying for jobs and internships, and Germany’s role in international trade.

GER 575: Theories GermanLanguage Acquisition
Instructor: Prof. Wei, Mariko
Advanced course designed to provide an overview of major theoretical issues in German language acquisition research. Permission of instructor required.

GER 581: German Culture
Instructor:  Marazka, Ibrahim
The development of the cultural life in German-speaking lands as reflected in architecture, art, history, literature, music, and philosophy. Lectures in German.

GER 596E: Acoustics of Speech
Instructor: Prof. Dmitrieva, Olga

GER 596F: Special Topics
Instructor: Prof. Channon, Robert

GER 596G: Second Language Speech
Instructor: Prof. Dmitrieva, Olga

GER 679: Heritage Language Acquisition and Teaching
Instructor: Prof. Cuza-Blanco, Alejandro

GER 679: L2 Materials Design
Instructor: Neary-Sundquist, Colleen

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